At UNM, our STEM faculty are amazing!


Check here on a regular basis to keep up with our latest accomplishments.

This year, seven women were awarded Women In Stem grants for their work on alcohol addiction, sand dune migration and matrilineal systems in China, among other topics.

UNM also has several NSF Career Award winners who have been recognized for their work.

Take a look at some of their accomplishments, and drop us a line if you or someone who know has done something interesting in a STEM field.

STEM faculty showcase

Our showcase is about new and interesting work by our women STEM faculty. See our archive for past stories.

Jessica Richardson

 

Dr. Jessica Richardson, center, an assistant professor and speech-language pathologist in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at The University of New Mexico, helps students Sarah Grace Dalton, left and Sheida Abdi, right to troubleshoot EEG paradigms in summer 2016. Richardson who also works with the Center for Brain Recovery and Repair, focuses her research on recovery from acquired brain injury, with a specific focus on aphasia recovery, neural plasticity, and treatment approaches, including brain stimulation, that improve life participation.

Dr. Jessica Richardson, center, an assistant professor and speech-language pathologist in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at The University of New Mexico, helps students Sarah Grace Dalton, left and Sheida Abdi, right to troubleshoot EEG paradigms in summer 2016.

Richardson, who also works with the Center for Brain Recovery and Repair at UNM, focuses her research on recovery from acquired brain injury, with a specific focus on aphasia recovery and neural plasticity. She also works on treatment approaches, including brain stimulation, that help improve life participation after a person has suffered a brain injury.

 

Maya Elrick

 
Dr. Maya Elrick, a professor in UNM's Earth and Planetary Science Department examines the strikingly rhythmic interbedding of these 380 million-year-old gray (limestone) and beige (shale) sedimentary layers that are the product of rapid (<2000 year) climate changes. The photo was taken in central Nevada near Eureka in 2014. Her research focuses on detecting ancient climate and sea-level changes in marine sedimentary rocks. Dr. Maya Elrick, a professor in UNM’s Earth and Planetary Science Department examines the strikingly rhythmic interbedding of these 380 million-year-old gray (limestone) and beige (shale) sedimentary layers that are the product of rapid climate changes. The photo was taken in central Nevada near Eureka in 2014.

Elrick, a carbonate sedimentologist-stratigrapher, has focused her research on detecting ancient climate and sea-level changes in marine sedimentary rocks. She has done research around the western United States including Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona as well as several other countries.

 

Barbara McCrady

 

Dr. Barbara McCrady, a distinguished professor of psychology at UNM and the director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions (CASAA) conducts a training as part of an institutional research training grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism at UNM's Logan Hall in 2015.Dr. Barbara  McCrady, a distinguished professor of psychology and the director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions (CASAA), at UNM, conducts a seminar at Logan Hall as part of an institutional training grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Dr. McCrady’s research focuses on empirically supported treatments for substance use disorders, with a particular focus on conjoint therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, mutual help groups, and therapies for women. McCrady created one of the first substance abuse treatment programs based on cognitive-behavioral therapy principles and tested the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the model.

 
advancestemshout

Our STEM Shoutouts recognize UNM faculty who are doing interesting research. Have you done something great in STEM recently? Let us know. We would love to hear about your recent awards, promotions or publications. You also can request that we write about your colleagues too.

Shoutout to: Dr. Irene Salinas

Fish research could help understand history of immune system

UNM Biology Professor Irene Salinas is conducting research into the presence of defense structures in the body of lungfish that could be the evolutionary forerunners of human tonsils and adenoids.

Salinas is working on a three-year NSF grant from the National Science Foundation. Now in year two, the grant so far has totaled $530,817.

“The goal of the research is to determine whether the transition of vertebrates from water to land resulted in the organization of the mucosal immune system of vertebrates,” Salinas said. “Specifically, if lymphocytes started to form organized groupings in lungfish, which is the closest living relative of all tetrapods.”

One Comment

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